Indoor Rock Climbing Binghamton NY

Local resource for indoor rock climbing in Binghamton. Includes detailed information on local businesses that provide access to indoor rock climbing facilities, rock climbing equipment, carabiners, climbing shoes, and rock climbing, as well as advice and content on how to get started on indoor rock climbing.

Dick's Sporting Goods
(607) 724-4361
347 Court Street
Binghamton, NY
 
Water & Wilderness
(607) 625-9922
P.O. Box 100
Apalachin, NY
 
Niagara Climbing Center
(716) 695-1248 x206
1333 Strad Avenue
North Tonawanda, NY
Description
6000 square feet of climbing terrain. 30 top rope stations, each 20 feet high. A variety of walls and routes to suit beginner, intermediate, and advanced climbers. Always fresh, quality routes by our in-house route-setters.

Island Rock Gym
(516) 822-ROCK
60 Skyline Blvd
Plainview, NY
 
Red Barn Climbing Gym
(585) 292-6571
RIT, 113 Lomb Memorial Drive
Rochester, NY
Description
Primarily a bouldering gym, Red Barn Climbing serves the RIT and greater Rochester community. Built in a 100 year old structure with limited heat and no facilities. Expect to climb in temperatures similar to what you find outside at the time of your visit.

Dick's Sporting Goods
(607) 797-5220
Town Square Mall
Vestal, NY
 
Joe Signs'' Kayak SuperStore & Boat Center
(607) 689-0330
3951 Waverly Rd
Owego, NY
 
Lindseth Climbing Wall
(607) 254-8255
Alberding Field House - Cornell University P.O. 729
Ithaca, NY
 
The Rock Club
(914) 633-7625
130 Rhodes St.
New Rochelle, NY
Description
40 ft climbing wall, 15,000+ sq ft of terrain with massive, radical bouldering. 70 top ropes, 25 lead stations. Huge lead arch. Routes from 5.5 to 5.13 and v0 to v10. World-class route setting. Beginner classes, intermediate and advanced clinics, social nights, women's climbing, Adult Climbing League and Bouldering Leagues.

RockSport
(518) 793-4626
138 Quaker Rd.
Queensbury, NY
Description
4000 sq. ft., 35' high climbing gym

Indoor Rock Climbing

Indoor rock climbing is growing in popularity as athletes learn the many benefits of the sport. First of all, it is safer for a novice than climbing out doors. The gyms that house the walls provide equipment to rent and skilled trainers for any level of experience. Once one is certified by the staff for the skills needed to climb or belay, an athlete can pair up with a beginner just learning to choose a pathway or an experienced climber looking to prepare indoors for a rigorous outdoor climb.

Another benefit is the variety of work the body must do to complete a successful climb. Most sports rely upon a limited number of muscle groups. Indoor rock climbing uses muscles many athletes forget they have. There are fingers that grasp the new holds straining with weight until one can move one’s feet. There are the calves and thighs that quiver while the foot is balanced on small outcroppings. There are the back muscles and stomach muscles that help keep another climber’s rope taut while belaying.

For those who normally pursue intellectual sports like golf and chess, indoor rock climbing can be a challenge as well. Not only must one consider several moves at one time, one must take into account the curves in the wall or the distances between holds. One must time pushing off and grasping again. While belaying for another one must consider when to give line and when to hold it tight.

Because of the need to learn both tasks, solo climbers the the opportunity to meet other like minded individuals. One must learn to trust an unfamiliar belayer and earn the climber's trust as one belays. This makes indoor rock climbing a complete sport. It hones the mind, the body and the spirit through physical, mental and social challenges. No wonder it gains popularity every year.